Archive for the ‘Woodworking’ Category

New: Cribbage For 2 … And California!   Leave a comment

It took me forever to get these done.

I had the idea. I had the design.

I even had the California boards done for months … but didn’t have the bases done.

For months.

Finally, though, I had my breakthrough and finally got 2 pairs of 2-person Cribbage boards done.

As with all of my boards, the base holds the cards & pegs. The tops are interchangeable, so you can choose the bottom and top that you most like.

The standard “race track” 2-player version is a common design; it’s the board that most people have used. The California board is my own design. Every California I make will have yellow wood in it … California is the Golden State, after all.

Half of these are now sold (note that I neglected to photograph one of the 2-player sets … and it’s sold. Sorry!). I was intrigued that the purchaser of the California set went stripey-stripey. No plain wooden pieces for her California!

I continue to add to the collection of custom 3- and 4-player boards. More of those designs will soon follow; check out the links below to see the other cribbage boards I have made.

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The Cribbage Obsession

This Cribbage Thing Is Catching On

New: Garlic Dipping Boards   Leave a comment

I was going to a foodie event … and I wanted to be prepared.

I talked to my buddy Nicole, the potter, and she agreed to make a batch of great garlic graters for me, in 2 shapes. My job: to find a board design that incorporated the great graters that I could live with … and Mrs M would allow me to make.

Something like that, anyway. She doesn’t get to tell me what to do, but after 41 years of marriage, she’s still trying.

She’s very trying.

But I digress.

I had to design the perfect well to put the great graters into, so I went to the CNC and started making shapes of different sizes and depths to see what would fit the samples that Nicole gave me the best.

It was not a quick process.

I finally settled on the proper dimensions, and decided to make most of the boards in the long, skinny, curvy shape you see above … that was inevitably called a surfboard by my California customers.

Dude! Not a surfboard! The nose would just dig in! But, alas, customers get to call boards what they want … after they buy them.

I ended up with 3 different shapes, and the buying process was very interactive. Customers got to choose the board they liked, then choose the great grater that either matched – or didn’t match. They got to choose their own custom set. I love that.

Here’s how they work: you peel a clove of garlic, and then rub it against the rough center of the great grater. It really pulverizes the garlic! Then, you pour in olive oil and add balsamic and spices to taste … serve with bread, and you’ve got a great appetizer!

Rub a raw clove of garlic on the grater.
I finished a batch of bread saws just for this event!
Add olive oil, spices to taste. Serve with sliced bread for a great appetizer!

I’m happy to report that the majority of these sold at the Gilroy Garlic Festival. I immediately texted Nicole to get a larger order of great graters for my Christmas shoppers. I sure hope that people buy these when they’re not in Gilroy!

Every Heart Is Unique   Leave a comment

When I design a piece, I always think about what I’m making. I mean, wouldn’t you?

When I make hearts, I know a few things to be true:

  1. Every heart is unique.
  2. Every heart has Bloodwood in it.
  3. People love to pick up a heart, turn to their beloved, and show them their big heart. Some even show their beating heart.

People have fun with my hearts, and I have to remember to keep making them. Like so many things, these have been sold out since last year … and I’m just catching up. In May.

I’m almost caught up. Almost.

Final thought: some people ask me if these are cutting boards. I always ask if they want people cutting on their heart. Making boards like these, you see, is really a philosophical endeavor for me.

Meanwhile, here are 16 hearts, submitted for your consideration.


New: Clocks   1 comment

“Does anybody really know what time it is? Does anybody really care?”

Those memorable words helped fuel my college years, sung by one of my favorite bands, the Chicago Transit Authority. You’ll find a link at the bottom of this post to a video of this signature tune.

If you are needing to know the time … I’m here to help. Clocks are the newest products to make it out of the garage woodshop. If you think people should know how to read a traditional clock … I’m here to help.

I’ve designed a small clock collection with 2 designs. Some have all of the numbers, some don’t. Woods used are Bloodwood, Hard Maple and Cherry. Each clock has a quartz movement, and comes with the AA battery to keep the time flowing for you. Each clock is 11″ across at its widest point.

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Posted May 4, 2019 by henrymowry in Woodworking

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The Cheese Slicer Success   Leave a comment

After a successful debut for this new product, it was back to the shop to make more before I ran out. 16 started … 15 made it to the finish line. One had a facial blowout along the way, so that one found its way to the recycling barrel.

These slicers are between 6″ and 7″ wide, and all are 11″ long. They’ve got non-skid rubber feet, and are now Mrs M approved.

She chose one of these (it’s in the first picture) to go into her personal collection. She doesn’t do that often, so I’ll take that sign of approval when I can!

If you’re in the mood for some expertly sliced cheese, you’ll find these at the Simi Valley Street Fair this Saturday. You’ll find me in booths 1901 and 1902.

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New: Cheese Slicers

The Return Of LSPs   1 comment

It’s been almost a year since I made Large Serving Pieces, or LSPs. I sold out of them months ago, of course, but I never quite got around to making more.

The set-up to make these is unique, and the nibbling away at the underside of the board to make the cove cuts that I’m so happy with … well, it takes awhile. And, today, it’s probably the dirtiest job I do in the shop. I made 15 of these LSPs this time. It took most of a day to do the primary shaping, and I covered the shop in dust.

Detail of Large Serving Piece 18 – 05.

The cove cuts are done by taking the work piece across the blade at an oblique angle … and that launches the dust to the left of the blade before the dust collector has much of a chance to get it. Further, these are open-faced cuts, so the above-the-table dust collection that I’ve recently added is disconnected. This cut that can only be done with the blade fully exposed.

Dust flies. A lot of dust flies.

That’s just a hazard of what I do. While making the cove cuts, I used a very large pushing device to keep my hand away from the cutting edge. I wore hearing protection and eye protection … next time, I’ll add a dust mask, too.

Because, you see, there will be a next time. I really enjoy making these unique pieces – even though birthing that unique design creates a bit of disruption on the shop!

All LSPs come with non-skid rubber feet held on with stainless steel screws. They have a food-ready finish: mineral oil + board butter, which is made with locally harvested beeswax.

I Love Making Big Ones   1 comment

Big cutting boards are a challenge … and the most satisfying when I reach the finish line.

Every cook needs a good cutting board, and these are the best. Here’s why:

  • End grain boards are like butcher’s blocks – a design that has been used for centuries. These boards are harder than edge grain boards (where you cut on the sides of the boards, actually scoring wood fibers). Here, you cut on the ends of the boards, with the grain pointing up.
  • End grain boards show less wear. And, when you oil these, they self heal. These boards look great sitting out on a counter.
  • Juice grooves are an option for these boards. It’s a philosophical question, really … so some have grooves, and some don’t. You’re an adult, you get to choose.
  • All boards have non-skid rubber feet, held on with stainless steel screws.
  • All boards have routed finger holds so they’re easy to pick up and move around.

The first board is one of my favorite “colorific” designs. I’ve now made this board twice, though each iteration had a different wood design. That’s normal for me: there are very few designs that I do repeatedly. Two designs here that I am repeating are the “Basic Cutting Board,” which is the simple Hard Maple/Black Walnut/Cherry design that there are 2 versions of, below. I try to always have that classic design on hand.

The other design that I’ve come to really like is is the third board, Cutting Board 19 – 303, which is Black Walnut, Hard Maple, Jatoba & Mesquite. I love the color blend on the edge, and the top notch work surface of Hard Maple in the center. Of course, I’m now out of Mesquite, so ….

Come see these and others this weekend in Santa Clarita! Mrs M and I will be at the KHTS Home & Garden Show in Central Park, Saturday & Sunday. We’re right by the free plant giveaway (yes, free) in the middle of the outdoor exhibits. It’s all a part of Santa Clarita’s official Arbor Day celebration. Come say hi!

New: Cheese Slicers   4 comments


These have been in my head for 18 months.

Crowded, it was.

Finally, these have sprung to life after I sat on the hardware for way, way too long.

Painful, it was.

These cheese slicers are each 7″ x 11″ x 7/8″. The slicer is a stainless steel wire that sits in the slot until it’s called upon to guillotine the cheese. In the first use of these, we found that they were interactive: perfect entertainment for a 7 year old boy.

Fun, it was.

This first run features 2 colors of handles: black and chrome. Each of the slicers has non-skid rubber feet held on with stainless steel screws, as does just about everything I make.

Want to see these live? You’ll have to be in Lake Havasu City, AZ this weekend for Winterfest. I know I’ll be there. Come join me!

Variety Is The Key For Me   Leave a comment

If you’re looking for same old, same old … don’t come to me.

I hope.

I’ve seen that my sales grow when I offer an incredible variety of wood designs, shapes, sizes and approaches to the things I make. I know that some woodworkers that do what i do make the same thing over and over … and, simply, that’s not for me. I would find that boring … and I believe that my customers would, as well.

Variety it is.

Here are a collection of serving pieces and shaped boards. Some are for cutting, some aren’t … their new owners will get to choose what they use them for.

Hover your cursor over the photo while on your laptop and computer (or click on the image using any device), and you’ll see the file name. That tells you what I call the piece. You can call it anything you like.

Sometimes, Small Is Good   Leave a comment

I make small cutting boards. Some people use these just for cutting fruit. Or, maybe these boards end up as a dedicated garlic/onion board.

Maybe it’s as big a cutting board as you need.

All good! These may not be big enough to prepare a holiday meal for a large gathering, but they have proven to be one of my most enduring, popular products. Many people add one of these small boards as a 2nd board, a holiday gift … or even use them as I name the thinner version: a cheese board.

In my lexicon, a Cheese Boards is about 8″ x 11″ x 5/8″. A Small Board is thicker, and no larger than 12″ x 12″ x 1″.

The names, though, are really only important to me. These are small cutting boards. This post catches me up with all of this type of board made at the end of the year for holiday giving, Kickstarter supporters and more.

The first few pictures are of a new design of small board that I’m trying. Each is 11″ x 11″ x 7/8″, and have a juice groove for those that prefer that, even on these relatively small boards. Enjoy!

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