Archive for November 2014

Unique Beauty   Leave a comment

New Mexico's White Sands National Monument. Photo by Donna Schneider. Tweeted by the US Department of the Interior, 11/25/14.

New Mexico’s White Sands National Monument. Photo by Donna Schneider. Tweeted by the US Department of the Interior, 11/25/14.

The Mid-Size Boards   4 comments

Handcrafted ByI noticed that when I made what I consider to be a mid-sized board, they sold almost immediately. Me being a little slow on the uptake at times, I eventually decided to see what would happen if I made several mid-size boards.

Want to find out with me? Today, I’m making a rare solo appearance without the Mrs M’s at the Holiday Arts & Crafts Faire sponsored by the Carpinteria Valley Museum of History. It’s located at 956 Maple Avenue in Carpinteria, 10a – 3p, … and you can see me, and these new boards, if you come to Carpinteria today!

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How To Buy A Board From Mr M’s Woodshop

15 Things I Learned In The Shop Today   2 comments

Woodshop 31. When the dust collector is full, I need to empty it immediately. Turning it off and continuing to generate sawdust is a poor option. Breathing sawdust is why there is a dust collector. (repeat as often as necessary).

2. It’s great having lumber. It’s not great when you’re out of storage space. Again.

3. Jarrah is a pain to work with. Splintery as oak, harder than maple. And the dust is an irritant. Prices are going up.

4. I need to drink more.

5. Cutting board CAD is a thing. Designing at the computer, building in the shop … I’m getting better at what I do.

Woodshop 26. I need a drum sander. Really. I need it. I just don’t have anywhere to put it.

7. When the bee dive bombed me – again – while I was using the table saw, I was done playing. I discovered that a dust collector hose disposed of the problem, permanently. I need my dust collector.

8. Really big cutting boards need a lot of materials. A lot of work. The 17″ x 21″ x 1-1/2″ end grain monster that I’m finishing weighs 13 pounds and drank a half pint of mineral oil. Prices are going up.

9. I’m using my LOUD planer so much, Velda now hates coming into the garage woodshop. Mission accomplished.

10. Love my planer.

Woodshop 111. I can see the end of my gorgeous stash of 8/4 black walnut, and it is not a pretty sight. It hurts when I cut every new board from the lumber rack.

12. Finishing takes a lot of time, and I always under-estimate how long it takes to plane, route and sand the latest stack of boards.

13. What happened? Suddenly, my hands are drying out. But when I use the lotion Mrs M made for me … I’m good. Note to self: lotion works. Maybe Mrs M is on to something.

14. The problem with regularly using 10 kinds of wood: I’m always out of something. Yesterday, I had to go buy more yellowheart. Today, I used the last of the padauk. (sigh)

15. Why doesn’t Europe have prettier hardwoods? Except, of course, for olive, which is, a) never available; and b) insanely expensive.

Posted November 28, 2014 by henrymowry in Woodworking

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Wild Turkey   Leave a comment

Eufala National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Michael Padgett. Tweeted by the US Department of the Interior, 11/26/14.

Happy Thanksgiving, from the Eufala National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Michael Padgett. Tweeted by the US Department of the Interior, 11/26/14.

Posted November 27, 2014 by henrymowry in Photography

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Fisher Cap Lake   1 comment

Glacier National Park in Montana is a sight to see in the fall! Adam Jewell captured this photo of Fisher Cap Lake on a frigid October morning. The low clouds, fog, a light dusting of snow and early morning sunlight helped create this amazing photo. Posted on Tumblr by the US Department of the Interior, 11/25/14.

Glacier National Park in Montana is a sight to see in the fall! Adam Jewell captured this photo of Fisher Cap Lake on a frigid October morning. The low clouds, fog, a light dusting of snow and early morning sunlight helped create this amazing photo. Posted on Tumblr by the US Department of the Interior, 11/25/14.

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Glacier National Park

Grinnell Formation

Grinnell Lake

Ninaistako

St Mary Falls

Two Medicine Lake

Which Is Prettier?

Posted November 26, 2014 by henrymowry in National Parks

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Fairweather Mountains   2 comments

Fairweather Mountains in the Glacier Bay National Park. Tweeted by the US Department of the Interior, 11/24/14.

Fairweather Mountains in the Glacier Bay National Park. Tweeted by the US Department of the Interior, 11/24/14.

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Glacier Bay National Park

Utah Is Bizarre … And Gorgeous   Leave a comment

Utah's Cedar Breaks National Monument at sunset. Photo by Jay Wanta. Tweeted by the US Department of the Interior, 11/21/14.

Utah’s Cedar Breaks National Monument at sunset. Photo by Jay Wanta. Tweeted by the US Department of the Interior, 11/21/14.

The Blue Lake   7 comments

Crater Lake Sunrise. Photo by Toby Harriman. Posted on Tumblr by the US Department of the Interior, 11/21/14.

Crater Lake Sunrise. Photo by Toby Harriman. Posted on Tumblr by the US Department of the Interior, 11/21/14.

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Crater Lake National Park

Spectacular

 

Buying A Board From Mr M’s Woodshop   2 comments

Staycation 66My online friends keep asking me … and I’m trying to help.

If you’re thinking about buying a cutting board or cheese board for a Christmas present, this post should make the process a bit easier for you. This isn’t a retail site, and I’m not on etsy … but I can make you a custom, handmade board and have it in your hands by Christmas. Here are the questions you need to answer:

1. What size do you want?

  • Cheese boards are generally 8″ x 10″, and up to 12″ x 12″. Cheese boards are between 3/4″ and 1-1/4″ thick.
  • The serving pieces (the cheese & cracker servers, and the “surfboard” server) are about 12″ x 19″ x 1-1/4″.
  • Cutting boards can be any size … 8″ x 10″ up to 18″ x 24″. Boards are at least 1″ thick, up to 1-1/2″ thick.

2. What woods do you want?

  • I use hardwoods exclusively, both domestic and international (which are called exotic hardwoods by woodworkers. We’re a colorful bunch.).
  • Cheese boards can be made from any wood, really. Notably, they can include the more porous hardwoods such as Ash, Oak and Hickory.
  • Cutting boards should be made from “close-grained hardwoods, such as Hard Maple” according to the FDA. Well, OK, then. Here are the woods I typically use:
    • Cherry
    • Honey Locust
    • Jarrah (just bought some, and it won’t last long!)
    • Jatoba (AKA Brazilian Cherry)
    • Maple (AKA hard maple, rock maple or sugar maple)
    • Padauk
    • Purpleheart
    • Teak
    • Walnut (AKA black walnut)
    • Yellowheart

3. Edge grain or end grain?

  • The classic butcher block cutting board is end grain hard maple. This looks like a checker board design according to many. The ends of the boards stick up towards the cutting surface … and this kind of board will show less wear than an edge gain board.

    # 1. Hard Maple end grain.

    # 1. Hard Maple end grain.

  • An edge grain board has the grain running the length of the board, and is generally described as a board full of stripes. This kind of board will show more wear, as the knife is cutting across the grain of the board. HOWEVER, these boards are made using hardwood, so they do not show wear as quickly as boards made of lower quality materials. Velda loves her edge grain board, and after a year of heavy use, it still looks like new when it’s got a fresh coat of mineral oil.
# 2. Edge grain cutting board. Hard Maple, Black Walnut, Cherry and Yellowheart.

# 2. Edge grain cutting board. Hard Maple, Black Walnut, Cherry and Yellowheart.

4. What do you want to spend?

Here are pictures and price ranges for the various sizes and kinds of boards. Some of those pictured are still available for sale; others will have to be built fresh by me. That’s OK … but remember, all boards are unique, so the grain patterns will vary in the board you receive if it’s a new build. However, if you can tell me what you like and what you don’t like, I’ll make sure you get something that’s perfect for you. I can even send you a picture in advance through this thing called the internet!

Buying A Board

1. Answer the 4 questions, above.

2. Look at the pictures, below. Click on the pictures to get them in a slide show with captions … or hover your mouse over the pictures to get the first part of the caption showing on this screen without clicking.

3. Tell me the answers to the 4 questions and the # or #s of the board(s) that you like.

4. If it’s in inventory, I’ll ship it to you directly. I can send you a paypal invoice, or you can send me a check. Mrs M’s Handmade, the parent company of Mr M’s Woodshop (HA!) does accept credit cards.

5. I have a new batch of boards that should be done by December 1. A second batch will follow for completion by December 15. All can be delivered by Christmas, guaranteed.

Cheese Boards, $30 – $60

These are examples only! The selection of woods and sizes makes the possibilities endless. That’s how it should be with handmade goods!

Serving Pieces, $60 – $90

The “surfboard” design will be coming out soon with a striped design, similar to the # 18 Cheese Board, and others.

Small Cutting Boards, $40 – $80

Small cutting boards can become cheese boards, based on what you want. Generally, cutting boards are thicker than cheese boards … but that’s strictly a personal preference.

Medium-sized Cutting Boards, $60 – $125

Large Cutting Boards, $100 & Up

Currently, all boards come with routed handholds and non-skid rubber feet held on with stainless steel screws. Boards are finished with mineral oil, and then get a top coat of locally-harvested beeswax and mineral oil. Each board will come with a tag identifying the woods used along with complete care instructions.

Want a juice groove? Add $25.

If you would like to buy a board, please use the “Contact Us” form and I’ll be back to you directly.

Please note that I’m making only two more batches of boards for guaranteed Christmas delivery. If you are interested, now is the time to start talking to me about your board!

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Cutting Boards: What Kind Do You Want?

Cutting Boards: Care & Cleaning

Cutting Boards: Restoration

The Beauty Of Winter   Leave a comment

A beautiful combination of fall foliage and snow-capped peaks at the Conway Summit Area of Critical Environmental Concern, California, to kick off your Wednesday. Take a drive along the BLM-managed Conway Summit ACEC and experience spectacular mountains, valleys, lakes, streams, and volcanic mountain chains. The dramatic display of well-preserved geologic features covers volcanic, glacial, erosive, and structural processes. From Conway Summit pass, there’s a breathtaking view of Mono Lake - a salt water lake fed by streams. And just south of Mono Lake are the Volcanic domes, including Panum Crater, Mono Crater Chain, and Inyo Crater. Learn more about this unique location: http://on.doi.gov/1zQZYOn Photo by Bob Wick, BLM. Posted on tumblr by the US Department of the Interior, 11/19/14.

A beautiful combination of fall foliage and snow-capped peaks at the Conway Summit Area of Critical Environmental Concern, California.
Take a drive along the BLM-managed Conway Summit ACEC and experience spectacular mountains, valleys, lakes, streams, and volcanic mountain chains. The dramatic display of well-preserved geologic features covers volcanic, glacial, erosive, and structural processes.
From Conway Summit pass (which is on US 395), there’s a breathtaking view of Mono Lake – a salt water lake fed by streams. And just south of Mono Lake are the Volcanic domes, including Panum Crater, Mono Crater Chain, and Inyo Crater.
Photo by Bob Wick, BLM. Posted on Tumblr by the US Department of the Interior, 11/19/14.

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