Archive for the ‘Pinnacles National Park’ Tag

Keeping It Wild   5 comments

If you've visited the visitor center on the west side you may have seen this familiar face. This bobcat helps keep the squirrel population in check. Look at its mouth closely. However, after yesterday’s successful catch a coyote chased it down trying to get its meal but the bobcat climbed up the tree and waited out the coyote. Oh the circle of life. From the Park's Facebook page.

Any picture of a bobcat is unusual, as these cats hunt at night when photographers aren’t as common. This particular bobcat lives on the west side of Pinnacles National Park, and is known to help keep the squirrel population in check. Look at its mouth closely. After this successful catch on 3/14/14, a coyote chased the bobcat down trying to get its meal. The bobcat kept its prize, though, by climbing up the tree and waiting out the coyote. Oh the circle of life. From the Park’s Facebook page.

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The Wild In Wilderness

Posted March 17, 2014 by henrymowry in National Parks, Photography

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Pinnacles National Park – Old Pinnacles Trail   1 comment

We hit the gate when it opened … so we could hike in the cool of the morning. This is not a park to visit in the heat of July! We stopped by the Visitor’s Center (you were supposed to pay there on the way in) … but it was closed. Just the yearlings and the wild turkey to keep up company!

We drove on and parked at the Moses Spring Trailhead. We took the Old Pinnacles Trail across the dry stream bed, and then crossed the bridge to take the trail towards the Bench. We walked a couple of hours; we didn’t do the big climb. I think you’ll agree that the hike was a good thing, though!

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Poison Oak

Acorn Woodpecker

Poison Oak: Toxicodendron diversilobum   5 comments

Leaflets three, let it be!

Poison oak is often seen in shady patches along California trails, with the vine growing into the sunlight to catch unwary hikers. The leaves, stems and branches all carry the oil that is poisonous. Hypersensitive people can develop rashes just by being near the plant, though most have to touch it to develop the rash.

These photographs were taken at the Pinnacles National Park, near Paicines, CA. Note the “real” oak leaves on the ground providing mulch for these poison oak plants.

Acorn Woodpecker: Melanerpes formicivorus   7 comments

These social woodpeckers spend their days jamming acorns into the holes they drill. As acorns dry and shrink, they’ll move them into smaller holes. The maintenance of their stores takes a lot of their time … so they generally work cooperatively. They live in groups, and always keep a guard around their acorn horde to ensure no interlopers, such as a stellar jay, steals the nuts they have stored. Acorn woodpeckers have been found living in groups with as many as 7 breeding males, 3 breeding females and 10 non-breeding helpers. The group makes a single nest, and young are raised by the community.

These photographs were taken at the Pinnacles National Park, near Paicines, CA.

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