Archive for the ‘Theodore Roosevelt’ Tag

Painted Canyon   Leave a comment

Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota honors President Theodore Roosevelt’s conservation legacy. Visitors can see Roosevelt’s Elkhorn Ranch Site, where he spent the bulk of his time and where many of his conservation ideas grew. In the spirit of Roosevelt’s outdoorsy nature, the park also offers plenty of opportunities to explore through hiking, kayaking, biking, camping and more. Sunset shot of Painted Canyon Overlook courtesy of Robert Gjestvang. Posted on Tumblr by the US Department of the Interior, 7/12/16.

Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota honors President Theodore Roosevelt’s conservation legacy. Visitors can see Roosevelt’s Elkhorn Ranch Site, where he spent the bulk of his time and where many of his conservation ideas grew. In the spirit of Roosevelt’s outdoorsy nature, the park also offers plenty of opportunities to explore through hiking, kayaking, biking, camping and more. Sunset shot of Painted Canyon Overlook courtesy of Robert Gjestvang. Posted on Tumblr by the US Department of the Interior, 7/12/16.

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Theodore Roosevelt National Park

Critters   1 comment

A Thanksgiving Truce   1 comment

A Thanksgiving Truce

“A Thanksgiving Truce” first appeared in the November 22, 1905 issue of Puck. President Theodore Roosevelt, shown here in his “Rough Rider” uniform, was an animal lover as well as an avid hunter, hence the Bear’s toast “(with deep feeling), ‘Here’s hoping that when next we meet, we see you first.'”

Roosevelt was one of our nation’s foremost conservationists. During his Presidency, he was the first to create National Forests, National Parks, National Game Preserves and much more.

From the Library of Congress.

On Education   Leave a comment

“To educate a person in the mind but not in morals is to educate a menace to society.”

“To educate a person in the mind but not in morals is to educate a menace to society.”
and
“A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad.”
– Theodore Roosevelt

"Let us think of education as the means of developing our greatest abilities, because in each of us there is a private hope and dream which, fulfilled, can be translated into benefit for everyone and greater strength for our nation."and"Our progress as a nation can be no swifter than our progress in education. The human mind is our fundamental resource."

“Let us think of education as the means of developing our greatest abilities, because in each of us there is a private hope and dream which, fulfilled, can be translated into benefit for everyone and greater strength for our nation.”
and
“Our progress as a nation can be no swifter than our progress in education. The human mind is our fundamental resource.”
– John F Kennedy

"Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful people with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated failures. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent."- Calvin Coolidge

“Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful people with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated failures. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent.”
– Calvin Coolidge

"Democracy cannot succeed unless those who express their choice are prepared to choose wisely. The real safeguard of democracy, therefore, is education."- Franklin Roosevelt, photo by Elias Goldensky, 1933.

“Democracy cannot succeed unless those who express their choice are prepared to choose wisely. The real safeguard of democracy, therefore, is education.”
– Franklin Roosevelt, photo by Elias Goldensky, 1933.

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Mixing Morals with Education?

On Reading   Leave a comment

Theodore Roosevelt, enjoying the great outdoors with a book.

“I am a part of everything that I have read.”
-Theodore Roosevelt

"Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing."- Benjamin Franklin, painting by David Martin, 1767

“Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing.”
– Benjamin Franklin, painting by David Martin, 1767

There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.- Will Rogers

“There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.”
– Will Rogers

“Not all readers are leaders, but all leaders are readers.”- Harry Truman

“Not all readers are leaders, but all leaders are readers.”
– Harry Truman

Mark Twain in a color chromograph on December 21, 1908. Credit: Alvin Langdon Coburn

“The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who can’t read.”
and
“Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint.”
– Mark Twain, in a color chromograph on December 21, 1908. Credit: Alvin Langdon Coburn

"There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them."- Ray Bradbury

“There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them.”
– Ray Bradbury

"From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it."and""- Groucho Marx

“From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it.”
and
“I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book.”
– Groucho Marx

“There are many little ways to enlarge your child’s world. Love of books is the best of all.”
– Jacqueline Kennedy

"Reading isn't good for a ballplayer. Not good for his eyes. If my eyes went bad even a little bit I couldn't hit home runs. So I gave up reading."- Babe Ruth

“Reading isn’t good for a ballplayer. Not good for his eyes. If my eyes went bad even a little bit I couldn’t hit home runs. So I gave up reading.”
– Babe Ruth

“A capacity and taste for reading gives access to whatever has already been discovered by others.”- Abraham Lincoln, shown here reading the Bible to his son, Tad

“A capacity and taste for reading gives access to whatever has already been discovered by others.”
– Abraham Lincoln, shown here reading the Bible to his son, Tad.
Photo by Anthony Berger, 1864.

Reading - Confucious

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How To Speed Read Like Theodore Roosevelt

The Most Beautiful Public Libraries In The World

All Things Leadership on Harry Truman

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Portraits: William Howard Taft   Leave a comment

William Howard Taft (1857 – 1930)

Taft was not a small man.

Taft was not a small man.

The 27th President of the United States, 1909 – 1913

AKA: Big Lub, Big Chief

From: Ohio

College: Yale University, University of Cincinnati College Of Law

Married to: Helen Herron

Children: Robert, Helen, Charles

Party: Republican

Previous Jobs: Journalist, lawyer, Collector of Internal Revenue, Superior Court Judge, US Solicitor General, US Court of Appeals Judge, Governor-General of the Philippines, Secretary of War, Provisional Governor of Cuba, Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court (after his Presidential term)

In His Words: “The welfare of the farmer is vital to that of the whole country.”

“The diplomacy of the present administration has sought to respond to modern ideas of commercial intercourse. This policy has been characterized as substituting dollars for bullets. It is one that appeals alike to idealistic humanitarian sentiments, to the dictates of sound policy and strategy, and to legitimate commercial aims.”

“The intoxication of power rapidly sobers off in the knowledge of its restrictions and under the prompt reminder of an ever-present and not always considerate press, as well as the kindly suggestions that not infrequently come from Congress.”

“We are all imperfect. We can not expect perfect government.”

“Next to the right of liberty, the right of property is the most important individual right guaranteed by the Constitution and the one which, united with that of personal liberty, has contributed more to the growth of civilization than any other institution established by the human race.”

“Socialism proposes no adequate substitute for the motive of enlightened selfishness that to-day is at the basis of all human labor and effort, enterprise and new activity.”

“Enthusiasm for a cause sometimes warps judgment.”

Not true: Many accounts credit Taft with the creation of baseball’s “seventh inning stretch,” but this is not proven.  Indeed, the practice is described as early as 1869, well before Taft’s supposed 1910 stretching of his legs at a Washington Senators game.

True: William Howard Taft started the tradition of the President throwing out the first ball at the beginning of baseball season.

He was the first President to take up golf, which was thought by some to be indecent if not immoral. His love for the sport did help spur an increase in the number of golfers in the nation, doubling the number of players on public courses. As with all Presidents, Taft’s affection for a recreational pastime caused political problems when critics suggested he should work more and play less.

Blame Taft: under his watch, the 16th Amendment was passed, legalizing the income tax.  No wonder he’s viewed poorly by many Presidential scholars.

Taft was the fattest President, tipping the scale at over 300 pounds.

After getting stuck in the White House bath tub, he had a very large bathtub installed, supposedly large enough for four men.

His close friend Teddy Roosevelt offered him a Supreme Court nomination many times, but Taft always refused because of unfinished work (principally while he was Governor-General of the Philippines).

His later break with Roosevelt (who felt he was not Progressive enough) led Roosevelt to oppose Taft’s re-election and found the Bull Moose party for the 1912 election.  The three-party election was won easily by the Democrat Woodrow Wilson.

Taft is the only President to also serve as the Supreme Court Chief Justice, where he initiated many reforms and administrative efficiencies.

Taft is the last President to have facial hair.

The Official Portrait: Painted in the White House Blue Room by Anders Zorn.  The portrait still hangs in this room.

William Taft, Official Presidential Portrait

Taft,-Williiam-FINAL

Portraits: Theodore Roosevelt   5 comments

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 – 1919)

The 26th President of the United States, 1901 – 1909

AKA: Teddy

From: New York

College: Harvard class of 1880, Columbia Law School

Married to: Alice Hathaway Lee, Edith Kermit Carrow

Both his mother and his first wife died on the same day; his diary entry said “The light has gone out of my life.”

Children: Alice (with Alice), and with Edith: Theodore Jr., Kermit, Ethel Carrow, Archibald Bulloch and Quentin

Party: Republican, Bull Moose

Previous Jobs: Cattle rancher, deputy sheriff, historian, naturalist, explorer, author of 35 books, police commissioner, assistant Secretary of the Navy, governor of New York, war hero, and lawyer.

In His Words:  “Speak softly and carry a big stick.”

“When they call the roll in the Senate, the Senators do not know whether to answer ‘present’ or ‘not guilty.'”

Portrait by Adrian Lamb

Not true: The Iron Ore, a newspaper in Marquette County, Upper Peninsula, Michigan, accused Teddy of public drunkenness.  The editorial stated, “Roosevelt lies, and curses in a most disgusting way, he gets drunk too, and that not infrequently, and all of his intimates know about it.”  Roosevelt was running for President at the time as the standard bearer for the Bull Moose Party, and he sued for libel in what became one of the most celebrated trials of 1912.  The newspaper editor admitted guilt, and Teddy settled for six cents … the “price of a good newspaper,” he said.  The Iron Ore cost three cents.

True: As the first conservationist president, he spearheaded the creation of the United States Forest Service, and established five new national parks. He was responsible for the start of the Wildlife Refuge system. During his administration, 42 million acres were set aside as national forests, wildlife refuges, and areas of special interest (such as the Grand Canyon).

He coined the phrase “good to the last drop” after being asked about the quality of Maxwell House coffee.

The Official Portrait:

Edith Roosevelt portrait, by Theobald Charlton, 1902

John Singer Sargent’s painting would be the official portrait of the President, but it wasn’t the first. In 1902 Theobald Chartran was  commissioned to paint portraits of the President and his wife. Although she enjoyed her’s, Teddy simply hated his. At first they tried to hide the blasted thing in an upper corridor in the darkest place on the wall. The family called it the “Mewing Cat.” Teddy disliked it so much that he eventually destroyed it.

What Teddy wanted was a man’s portrait by a artist that could capture the adventurer that he was.

The two men walked around the house searching for the right setting, but nothing was working. As they climbed the stairs, Teddy barked that Sargent must not know what he wanted. Sargent, who was also frustrated, snapped back that he didn’t think the President appreciated what was needed to pose for a portrait. Roosevelt, the stairway landing, planted his hand on the balustrade post, turned onto the ascending artist and said,  “Don’t I!”

And that was the pose Sargent wanted.

Sargent’s portrait of Teddy Roosevelt was exactly what Teddy Roosevelt wanted and he would adore the portrait for the rest of his life. It had exactly captured, in the President’s eyes, the essence of his energy as well as his presidency.

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