Archive for the ‘National Lakeshore’ Tag

Summer Color   Leave a comment

Whoa.   Leave a comment

It’s rare that a photograph makes me gasp at its beauty, but this one did. After a passing storm, this beautiful sunrise was captured at Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, which is on the south shore of Lake Superior in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Photo by Steve Perry. Tweeted by the US Department of the Interior, 5/12/17.

Posted July 6, 2017 by henrymowry in Photography

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Apostle Island National Lakeshore   2 comments

A National Lakeshore should be picture perfect … just like Wisconsin’s Apostle Island. The sun rises over Lake Superior. Photo by Michael Dewitt. Posted on Tumblr by the US Department of the Interior, 5/18/17.

Posted May 18, 2017 by henrymowry in Photography

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Unique Sights   Leave a comment

Last Light   1 comment

Lake Michigan Overlook In Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, near Empire, MI. Picture by Steve Perry. Posted on Tumblr by the US Department of the Interior, 7/6/15.

Lake Michigan Overlook In Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, near Empire, MI. Picture by Steve Perry. Posted on Tumblr by the US Department of the Interior, 7/6/15.

The Ice Caves   Leave a comment

This Saturday, the breathtaking ice caves at Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in Wisconsin will open for the first time this season. The ice caves are an always changing phenomenon — the  formations change from chamber to chamber and from day to day. The result is a fairyland of needlelike icicles. Visiting the ice caves requires at least a 2 mile hike across Lake Superior, and present conditions might make it a challenging trek. For up-to-date info on the ice caves, visit ww.nps.gov/apis or call the Ice Line at (715) 779-3397 - extension 3. National Park Service photo. Posted on Tumblr by the US Department of the Interior 2/25/15.

This Saturday, the breathtaking ice caves at Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in Wisconsin will open for the first time this season. The ice caves are an always changing phenomenon — the formations change from chamber to chamber and from day to day. The result is a fairyland of needlelike icicles. Visiting the ice caves requires at least a 2 mile hike across Lake Superior, and present conditions might make it a challenging trek. For up-to-date info on the ice caves, visit ww.nps.gov/apis or call the Ice Line at (715) 779-3397 – extension 3. National Park Service photo. Posted on Tumblr by the US Department of the Interior, 2/25/15.

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